Politics and Society

Coronavirus and Contemplation: A Second Reflection

I have been reflecting on the connections between our social distancing and contemplative practice for well over a week now, and had hoped to offer some reflections on this very thing. At the same time, I certainly did not want to be trite or to use the situation to garner attention or to push a cause. We do not know what the repercussions of current events may be, and we face the specter of economic and financial hardship for some time to come. God’s will be done; we have to submit ourselves to his mercy as well as his majesty. Still, it seems like sacred ground, and I have been circumspect to dare to tread here....

Coronavirus and Contemplation: A First Reflection

I have been reflecting on the connections between our social distancing and contemplative practice for well over a week now, and had hoped to offer some reflections on this very thing. At the same time, I certainly did not want to be trite or to use the situation to garner attention or to push a cause. We do not know what the repercussions of current events may be, and we face the specter of economic and financial hardship for some time to come. God’s will be done; we have to submit ourselves to his mercy as well as his majesty. Still, it seems like sacred ground, and I have been circumspect to dare to tread here....

All Our Choices, & the Choice of Love: A Christmas Reflection

Contemporary western life presents us with a dizzying array of possibilities and choices to make. From the chockablock shelves of stores with a billion products vying for our attention, to larger decisions about places to live, people to keep company with, political and social opinions to embrace, we live constantly under the pretense of choice....

Unfastened From the Party Line: Contemplative Prayer and Public Discourse

After a visit to my parents’ house in New Hampshire, Maureen, my wife, and I like to meander along the backroads home to the Catskills. At about our half-way point is a small but thriving bookstore/café where we generally make a stop. While browsing through the crowded shelves I came across a book entitled, I’m Right and You’re an Idiot: The Toxic State of Public Discourse and How to Clean It Up. Though one should never judge a proverbial (and, in this case, actual) book by its cover, I could not help but to give this particular cover a nod of consent. The title represents a problem that is deep and dangerous in our time....