Contemplative Prayer

The Original Christian Sports Ministry: Training in the Life of Prayer

Christian sports ministries seem to be growing in popularity, and it is understandable why. Deep down, we know that being Christian requires an athletic frame of mind. It requires training, teamwork, concentration, acquired skill. It requires that we contend, giving our best and fullest. In the early ages of the Church, Christians were discouraged from participating in secular games. Instead, Christians contended in the unseen, spiritual warfare of a life devoted to prayer. Mons Nubifer Sanctus provides the original Christian sports ministry: training in this way of prayer....

Are You Ready for a Silent Retreat?

Attending a silent retreat at Mons Nubifer Sanctus can be challenging. But challenge and growth in the Christian spiritual life go together. If we are not being challenged, we are likely not growing in our life in God. Our silent contemplative prayer retreats provide authentic training in Christian virtue. They help to deepen prayer and the sense of worship before the incontestable majesty of God. Are you ready to try a silent retreat at Mons Nubifer Sanctus?...

2019 Christmas Sermon

The year that I was conceived, my father found himself in the middle of a volatile conflict. We had been receiving death threats, our family phone was being tapped, and he faced losing his livelihood for no good reason. To add insult to injury, my mother was struggling with severe neurological symptoms with a diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. Doctors were telling her that she would likely be spending the remainder of her life in a wheelchair. My parents’ hands were full with two infant boys, and when my mother was pregnant with me, I’ve been told that my father was so upset that he didn’t speak to her for a month. Knowing my father, I believe it, though it was likely more out of depression and stress than anger—though I’m...

Poem: Prayer

Since I’ve welcomed you I have become aware Of things untended A cobweb here, there Paint cracked and peeling Ceiling tiles stained From an ages-old Leak....

Practicing Advent

The Feast of the Resurrection (commonly known as “Easter”) is the central celebration for Christians. The Feast of the Nativity of Christ, however, has taken a close second place. It celebrates the Incarnation of God in Jesus Christ, an historical event that continues in the Church. Both of these feasts are marked by an extensive period of preparation characterized by penitence, sacrifice, and solemnity. These periods are Lent and Advent....

Chocolate, Hot Dates, and Contrition: Valentine’s Day and Lent

This year, February 14 is both Saint Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday, the beginning of the penitential season of Lent in which Christians commit to fasting, almsgiving and other spiritual disciplines in preparation for Easter. How does one reconcile chocolates, hot dates, fasting and contrition? Perhaps Saint Valentine himself offers an answer....

All Our Choices, & the Choice of Love: A Christmas Reflection

Contemporary western life presents us with a dizzying array of possibilities and choices to make. From the chockablock shelves of stores with a billion products vying for our attention, to larger decisions about places to live, people to keep company with, political and social opinions to embrace, we live constantly under the pretense of choice....

It’s Advent, Not Christmas! The Contemplative Language of the Liturgical Seasons

Christmas is so much more than the celebration of an historical event. However significant and consequential for eternal destiny the birth of Jesus Christ of the Virgin Mary was, the symbolic and liturgical language of the Church points us to deeper things than a mere historical commemoration of this blessed occasion in Bethlehem....

Contemplative Prayer: Knowing God in the Biblical Sense

When translating any text into another language there are two approaches that one can take. On the one hand, literal translations strive to faithfully and consistently represent, as far as is possible, the source texts. In both Greek and Hebrew, which are the original languages of the Bible, word orderings are often different than they would be in English usage. A truly literal translation of biblical texts, then, would in many ways be incoherent, and certainly strange to our ears....